#76

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:00
von Willie | 19.337 Beiträge | 46908 Punkte

Cardinal O'Malley, The American`Cappuccino Priest' Is A Hit In Rome
The archbishop of Boston, dressed more often in the humble brown robe of his religious order than a cardinal's regalia, has emerged as an unlikely star amid the drama unfolding in Rome.

Vatican analysts for the leading Italian newspapers have repeatedly listed Cardinal Sean O'Malley as one of the favorite contenders in the conclave starting Tuesday.

As recently as two weeks ago, O'Malley hadn't appeared on the lists of papabili, or cardinals with papal potential, that church watchers pore over each morning like sports scores, even though only the cardinal-electors know how they will vote. Vatican observers said no American cardinal could win: A superpower pope risked mixing church and U.S. interests. O'Malley is also a Capuchin Franciscan, and few members of religious orders have led the church.

But O'Malley arrived to a country in an anti-establishment mood.

A comedian, Beppe Grillo, had grabbed a quarter of the parliamentary vote, leaving the political leadership of Italy in limbo.

The Vatican central administration, or Curia, had been weathering a string of scandals. Benedict XVI's own butler had leaked the former pontiff's private papers, revealing feuding, corruption and cronyism at the highest levels of the bureaucracy. The secretive Vatican bank had recently ousted a president for incompetence and is under pressure for greater financial transparency.

In the cardinal, Italians saw a white knight. The 68-year-old O'Malley has spent his career as a bishop cleaning up dioceses shattered by child sex abuse. From O'Malley's lengthy track record, one story seems to have captured the most attention: after he arrived in Boston in 2003, then the epicenter of the church scandal, O'Malley decided to sell the Italian Renaissance mansion that had been home to the previous four Boston archbishops. The millions of dollars from the sale would help pay settlements to victims.

The bearded, soft-spoken cardinal has even earned a nickname – the cappuccino priest – a play on the Italian name for his order, the same word for the coffee drink.

"Give me the cappuccino priest, not the Italians," said Giuliana Piaella, 57, a waitress serving lunch at a Rome restaurant. "He's a clean-looking guy, perfect age, and has a serious face. He has a calm face, full of self-confidence. He wears open sandals, which show his humility. Catholics don't do that anymore. We need someone who's close to the people."

It took O'Malley just six weeks from the time he was installed in Boston to settle hundreds of sex abuse claims that had kept the archdiocese in crisis. His predecessor, Cardinal Bernard Law, had resigned as archbishop in December 2002, after a Massachusetts judge unsealed the files of one predator priest kept in parish assignments by church officials without warning parents or police. The revelations sparked a crisis that spread through every American diocese and beyond.

The day after he took over in Boston, he revamped the legal team representing the archdiocese, hiring an attorney who had helped him settle abuse claims when he led the Diocese of Fall River, Mass., a decade ago. O'Malley was personally involved in the Boston negotiations, spending hours with victims' attorneys to reach the $85 million deal for 552 plaintiffs. Attorneys for victims credited him with showing compassion that other church officials had not.

In the Diocese of Fall River, a southern New England city of fishermen and shuttered textile mills, O'Malley had inherited the damage from one of the most notorious pedophiles in the American clergy crisis. Former priest James Porter was accused of raping children in five states in the 1960s and 1970s. He pleaded guilty in 1993 to 41 counts of molestation.

It was a time when the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops was only starting to confront the national scope of the abuse crisis. O'Malley is credited with instituting a policy that almost no other diocese at the time had. Abuse allegations would be referred to a social worker outside the church. A board of mental health and legal professionals reviewed how each case was handled and church workers were required to alert civil authorities about any allegation that a child had been abused.

In 2002, Pope John Paul II sent O'Malley to Palm Beach, Fla., where two previous bishops had resigned after admitting they had molested young people. Then he sent him to Boston.

O'Malley has his critics in Boston and elsewhere.

A series of church closings he announced in the archdiocese brought angry protests by parishioners and around-the-clock sit-ins. Some parishioners hired canon lawyers and brought their complaints to the Vatican. And in 2002, a Massachusetts prosecutor, Paul Walsh of Bristol County, publicly released the names of about 20 Fall River priests accused of molesting children in the 1960s and 1970s, who had never been criminally charged.

Walsh said he did so out of frustration with recalcitrant church officials. O'Malley said in a statement at the time that when he arrived in Fall River, he had been focused on the Porter case and had no indication that prosecutors were interested in investigating old allegations.

Marco Politi, a papal biographer, said O'Malley is benefiting from the Italian love for Franciscans and from the desire for a pope from another country, who Italians believe will not get involved in Italian politics. At least one profile of O'Malley in Italian media noted that in 2010, he criticized Italian Cardinal Angelo Sodano, who had dismissed victims' criticism of the church as "petty gossip" just as the crisis was erupting in Europe.

"O'Malley comes across as a humble man in robes who communicates well," Politi said. "They admire him for selling off the expensive archbishop's palace to pay debts, and that he lives in a simple home."

O'Malley, a native of Lakewood, Ohio, studied at a Franciscan seminary, then joined the religious order and was ordained at 26. A graduate student at the Catholic University of America, he earned a master's degree in religious education and a doctorate in Spanish and Portuguese literature.

O'Malley now speaks eight languages, including Italian, Portuguese and Haitian Creole, according to his spokesman Terrence Donilon. He asks parishioners to address him informally as "Cardinal Sean."

Despite all the attention, Donilon said Tuesday the cardinal "expects to be going home."

Speaking last week at the North American College, the prominent seminary for American priests in Rome, O'Malley played down his prospects, pointing to his brown robe.

"I've worn this uniform for over 40 years and I presume I will wear it until I die," he said. "Because I don't expect to be elected pope, so I don't expect to have a change of wardrobe."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/13...hp_ref=religion


nach oben springen

#77

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:03
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #75
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #74
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #73
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #62

In gespannter Erwartung ist das Forum recht ruhig geworden.:) Vielleicht wird ja so mancher harter Disput bald eingeläutet.

Es fehlt halt noch die Info, auf wen wir Fundamentalisten uns stürtzen durfen! :)

Hauptsache die alten Beissreflexe funktionieren vorher wie nachher gleichermassen... ;-)


Ich bin da ganz entspannt und würde mich auch positiv überraschen lassen.


Da müsste es aber schon Hans Küng werden, oder vielleicht eine Frau.
:-))



Es müsste nicht einmal ein bekennder Schwuler in gleichgeschlechtlicher Lebensgemeinschaft sein, nein. Bei Nichtkatholiken geht ihn das aber nix an.


nach oben springen

#78

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:05
von Willie | 19.337 Beiträge | 46908 Punkte

Papal conclave: anti-mafia police raid offices in diocese of frontrunner
Cardinals urged to overcome divisions at special mass shortly after detectives mount dawn raids in diocese of Angelo Scola

"...Anti-mafia detectives swooped on homes, offices, clinics and hospitals in Lombardy, the region around Milan, and elsewhere. A statement said the dawn raids were part of an investigation into "corruption linked to tenders by, and supplies to, hospitals".

Healthcare in Lombardy is the principal responsibility of the regional administration, which for the past 18 years has been run by Roberto Formigoni, a childhood friend of Scola and the leading political representative of the Communion and Liberation fellowship. Until recently, Scola was seen as the conservative group's most distinguished ecclesiastical spokesman...."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/mar...s-conclave-pope


nach oben springen

#79

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:35
von Maga-neu | 21.156 Beiträge | 46065 Punkte

@ Willie: Was Scola und Formigoni angeht, so waren diese nicht "childhood friends", sondern standen sich insofern nahe, als sie beide zur Entourage des CL-Gründers Don Giussani zählten.

Die Korruption in Mailand ist leider endemisch und hat nichts mit Scola zu tun - so kritisch ich diesen in mancher Hinsicht sehe. Man denke daran, dass bereits die Aktion "mani pulite" in Mailand ihren Anfang nahm.



zuletzt bearbeitet 13.03.2013 17:37 | nach oben springen

#80

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:35
von Maga-neu | 21.156 Beiträge | 46065 Punkte

Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #75
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #74
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #73
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #62

In gespannter Erwartung ist das Forum recht ruhig geworden.:) Vielleicht wird ja so mancher harter Disput bald eingeläutet.

Es fehlt halt noch die Info, auf wen wir Fundamentalisten uns stürtzen durfen! :)

Hauptsache die alten Beissreflexe funktionieren vorher wie nachher gleichermassen... ;-)


Ich bin da ganz entspannt und würde mich auch positiv überraschen lassen.


Da müsste es aber schon Hans Küng werden, oder vielleicht eine Frau.
:-))

Vielleicht Frau Ranke-Heinemann? :-)


nach oben springen

#81

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:46
von Willie | 19.337 Beiträge | 46908 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #79
@ Willie: Was Scola und Formigoni angeht, so waren diese nicht "childhood friends", sondern standen sich insofern nahe, als sie beide zur Entourage des CL-Gründers Don Giussani zählten.

Die Korruption in Mailand ist leider endemisch und hat nichts mit Scola zu tun - so kritisch ich diesen in mancher Hinsicht sehe. Man denke daran, dass bereits die Aktion "mani pulite" in Mailand ihren Anfang nahm.


Ich denke, der operative Satz hier ist der letzte von mir zitierte:
"...Until recently, Scola was seen as the conservative group's most distinguished ecclesiastical spokesman...'

Da kommt mir der Satz in den Sinn : "Sage mir mit wem du umgehst und ich sage dir wer du bist."

Daran mag zwar in diesem Falle nichts dran sein, aber es hat nunmal eben so ein -wie der Schwabe sagt- "Geschmaeckle".



zuletzt bearbeitet 13.03.2013 18:22 | nach oben springen

#82

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 17:49
von Lea S. | 14.199 Beiträge | 13418 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #80
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #75
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #74
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #73
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #62

In gespannter Erwartung ist das Forum recht ruhig geworden.:) Vielleicht wird ja so mancher harter Disput bald eingeläutet.

Es fehlt halt noch die Info, auf wen wir Fundamentalisten uns stürtzen durfen! :)

Hauptsache die alten Beissreflexe funktionieren vorher wie nachher gleichermassen... ;-)


Ich bin da ganz entspannt und würde mich auch positiv überraschen lassen.


Da müsste es aber schon Hans Küng werden, oder vielleicht eine Frau.
:-))

Vielleicht Frau Ranke-Heinemann? :-)





Och nöööööö, diese Labertasche............


nach oben springen

#83

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:00
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #80
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #75
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #74
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #73
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #62

In gespannter Erwartung ist das Forum recht ruhig geworden.:) Vielleicht wird ja so mancher harter Disput bald eingeläutet.

Es fehlt halt noch die Info, auf wen wir Fundamentalisten uns stürtzen durfen! :)

Hauptsache die alten Beissreflexe funktionieren vorher wie nachher gleichermassen... ;-)


Ich bin da ganz entspannt und würde mich auch positiv überraschen lassen.


Da müsste es aber schon Hans Küng werden, oder vielleicht eine Frau.
:-))

Vielleicht Frau Ranke-Heinemann? :-)



Die wäre Manns genug, dem Laden mal etwas Schwung zu verpassen! :)


nach oben springen

#84

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:01
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Lea S. im Beitrag #82
Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #80
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #75
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #74
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #73
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #62

In gespannter Erwartung ist das Forum recht ruhig geworden.:) Vielleicht wird ja so mancher harter Disput bald eingeläutet.

Es fehlt halt noch die Info, auf wen wir Fundamentalisten uns stürtzen durfen! :)

Hauptsache die alten Beissreflexe funktionieren vorher wie nachher gleichermassen... ;-)


Ich bin da ganz entspannt und würde mich auch positiv überraschen lassen.


Da müsste es aber schon Hans Küng werden, oder vielleicht eine Frau.
:-))

Vielleicht Frau Ranke-Heinemann? :-)





Och nöööööö, diese Labertasche............


Radio Vatikan lässt sich auch abschalten!:)


nach oben springen

#85

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:06
von Willie | 19.337 Beiträge | 46908 Punkte

So sieht es TPM:

Scola Reaches Youth Through Kerouac And McCarthy

To illustrate that life is a journey, one of the Italian cardinals touted as a favorite to be the next pope doesn’t just turn to the Scriptures — but also to Jack Kerouac and Cormac McCarthy.

Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, is seen as Italy’s best chance at reclaiming the papacy, following back-to-back popes from outside the country that had a lock on the job for centuries.

For one night last month, during the historic week that saw the shock resignation announcement of Pope Benedict XVI, Scola came across as a simple pastor leading a flock of 20-somethings in a discussion about faith. The powerful cardinal displayed not only an ease with youth but also a desire to make himself understood, a vital quality for a church that is bleeding membership. It was a sharp contrast with Benedict, who was almost painfully shy in public.

Quoting from Kerouac’s iconic Beat Generation novel “On the Road,” Scola invited his audience of students to reflect on whether they “were going to get somewhere, or just going.” And he cited McCarthy’s post-apocalyptic father-son journey in “The Road,” urging youths to consider the meaning of “destination” — a key theme in McCarthy’s work.

“The destination is a happy life, an accomplished life that doesn’t end with death but with eternal life,” the archbishop said.

Scola, 71, has commanded both the pulpits of Milan’s Duomo as archbishop and Venice’s St. Mark’s Cathedral as patriarch, two extremely prestigious church positions that together gave the world five popes during the 20th century.

Scola was widely viewed as a papal contender when Benedict was elected eight years ago. His promotion to Milan, Italy’s largest and most influential diocese, has been seen as a tipping point in making him a hot favorite for the papacy. But while Italy has the most cardinals — 28 — participating in the conclave, the Italian contingent is also said to be fractured among those inside the Roman Curia — the Vatican’s bureaucracy — and those outside, where Scola enjoys more support.

Crucially, the Milan and Venice posts have allowed Scola to polish his pastoral credentials, adding human outreach to his already considerable intellectual achievements.
Vatican analyst John Thavis, who recently published “The Vatican Diaries” about the inner workings of the Holy See, recalls visiting Scola in Venice, where he generated “a great deal of enthusiasm” among parishioners, despite sometimes delivering a dense message.
“He is very dynamic, but he has a hard time speaking in simple language. I will be honest with you. There are times when Cardinal Scola can get rolling and you find yourself sort of in the clouds,” Thavis said. “So it would be interesting if he is elected pope to see how he comes out and talks to the people.”....

....He speaks fluent English, French and German beyond his native Italian — along with the Lecco dialect from the corner of Lake Como where he grew up. He also understands Spanish. ...

“Scola is one of the personalities that presents diverse talents and certain gifts that are to his advantage,” said Sandro Magister, a Vatican analyst who closely monitors the institution’s behind-the-scenes maneuvering. “He is certainly a solid theologian, formed along the same lines as (Benedict). … This is already something to his advantage.”

Scola is recognized as a conservative in the Church, rejecting the idea of women priests and denouncing consumerism. His association with the conservative Italian movement Communion and Liberation has raised eyebrows.

Scola was a theology student when he was invited to join the group, which blends political activism with faith-based fervor as it seeks to influence Italy’s decision-making. Many prominent Italian politicians have been associated with the movement; in the 1970s Scola is said to have instructed former premier Silvio Berlusconi, then a real estate developer, in philosophy.

Scola more recently has sought to distance himself from the movement, especially as a number of officials linked to it have been swept into scandal. The Vatican’s official biography of Scola says he stopped active participation in 1991, when John Paul II appointed him bishop of Grossetto in Tuscany. ....
http://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/scola-...y.php?ref=fpblg


nach oben springen

#86

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:06
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #79
@ Willie: Was Scola und Formigoni angeht, so waren diese nicht "childhood friends", sondern standen sich insofern nahe, als sie beide zur Entourage des CL-Gründers Don Giussani zählten.

Die Korruption in Mailand ist leider endemisch und hat nichts mit Scola zu tun - so kritisch ich diesen in mancher Hinsicht sehe. Man denke daran, dass bereits die Aktion "mani pulite" in Mailand ihren Anfang nahm.



Hat er nicht die Dienstaufsicht für kath. Krankenhäuser? Hier mischen die sich sogar in die Behandlung ein.


nach oben springen

#87

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:06
von Lea S. | 14.199 Beiträge | 13418 Punkte

Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #83
Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #80
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #75
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #74
Zitat von Swann im Beitrag #73
Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #62

In gespannter Erwartung ist das Forum recht ruhig geworden.:) Vielleicht wird ja so mancher harter Disput bald eingeläutet.

Es fehlt halt noch die Info, auf wen wir Fundamentalisten uns stürtzen durfen! :)

Hauptsache die alten Beissreflexe funktionieren vorher wie nachher gleichermassen... ;-)


Ich bin da ganz entspannt und würde mich auch positiv überraschen lassen.


Da müsste es aber schon Hans Küng werden, oder vielleicht eine Frau.
:-))

Vielleicht Frau Ranke-Heinemann? :-)



Die wäre Manns genug, dem Laden mal etwas Schwung zu verpassen! :)


Bei aller Liebe zur Aufsässigkeit, neeeeeeee


nach oben springen

#88

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:15
von Willie | 19.337 Beiträge | 46908 Punkte

Cardinal Schoenborn's Mom, Eleonore, 92, Hopes He Won't Become Pope
Austrian Cardinal Christoph Schoenborn's elderly mother hopes he won't become pope because she fears she would never see him and that he would be overwhelmed by Vatican intrigues.

"The whole family is afraid that Christoph will be elected pope," Eleonore Schoenborn, 92, told the Kleine Zeitung newspaper in an interview printed on Tuesday as 115 Roman Catholic cardinals gathered in Rome to pick the new head of the Church.
Recalling Pope Benedict's farewell speech, which made clear that popes belonged entirely to the Church, she said her son's elevation would mean "it is over for me. Then I will not see Christoph ever again because I no longer have the strength to travel to Rome".
Schoenborn, 68, is often mentioned as a possible papal candidate.

A former student of Benedict's with a pastoral touch the retired pontiff lacked, the archbishop of Vienna has been a rising star since editing the Church's catechism in the 1990s.
But some cautious stands on reform and strong dissent by some Austrian priests could hurt him.

He and his mother meet in Vienna for a couple weeks every year and Christoph calls her every Saturday, said Eleonore, who lives at the other end of the country in Vorarlberg province.

He has a firm grip on the Vienna archdiocese, but leading the world's 1.2 billion Catholics would be too much of a challenge for Schoenborn, she said.
"Christoph would not be up to the bitchiness in the Vatican. The intrigues in Vienna are enough for him," she said, adding that he got really annoyed when people were dishonest.

But the paper said Schoenborn had told his family before the conclave: "Don't get worked up. I certainly won't become pope."
(Reporting by Michael Shields; Editing by Kevin Liffey)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/12...hp_ref=religion


nach oben springen

#89

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:16
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Lea S. im Beitrag #87
Bei aller Liebe zur Aufsässigkeit, neeeeeeee



:)))))))))))


nach oben springen

#90

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:21
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Willie im Beitrag #88
Cardinal Schoenborn's Mom, Eleonore, 92, Hopes He Won't Become Pope"Christoph would not be up to the bitchiness in the Vatican. The intrigues in Vienna are enough for him," she said,


Wenn Frau Mama ihm das mit auf den Weg gegeben hat, wäre er genau der Richtige.


nach oben springen

#91

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:47
von Maga-neu | 21.156 Beiträge | 46065 Punkte

Zitat von Willie im Beitrag #88
Cardinal Schoenborn's Mom, Eleonore, 92, Hopes He Won't Become Pope
Austrian Cardinal Christoph Schoenborn's elderly mother hopes he won't become pope because she fears she would never see him and that he would be overwhelmed by Vatican intrigues.

"The whole family is afraid that Christoph will be elected pope," Eleonore Schoenborn, 92, told the Kleine Zeitung newspaper in an interview printed on Tuesday as 115 Roman Catholic cardinals gathered in Rome to pick the new head of the Church.
Recalling Pope Benedict's farewell speech, which made clear that popes belonged entirely to the Church, she said her son's elevation would mean "it is over for me. Then I will not see Christoph ever again because I no longer have the strength to travel to Rome".
Schoenborn, 68, is often mentioned as a possible papal candidate.

A former student of Benedict's with a pastoral touch the retired pontiff lacked, the archbishop of Vienna has been a rising star since editing the Church's catechism in the 1990s.
But some cautious stands on reform and strong dissent by some Austrian priests could hurt him.

He and his mother meet in Vienna for a couple weeks every year and Christoph calls her every Saturday, said Eleonore, who lives at the other end of the country in Vorarlberg province.

He has a firm grip on the Vienna archdiocese, but leading the world's 1.2 billion Catholics would be too much of a challenge for Schoenborn, she said.
"Christoph would not be up to the bitchiness in the Vatican. The intrigues in Vienna are enough for him," she said, adding that he got really annoyed when people were dishonest.

But the paper said Schoenborn had told his family before the conclave: "Don't get worked up. I certainly won't become pope."
(Reporting by Michael Shields; Editing by Kevin Liffey)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/12...hp_ref=religion
Der "Job" ist unmöglich. Kein Mensch bei gesundem Verstand kann ihn wollen; man kann ihn höchstens als Bürde annehmen.
Ich habe auch den Eindruck, dass Schönborn vielleicht etwas zu wenig hart sein könnte. Dieses Problem hätte Scola sicher nicht. :-)

Immerhin: Auf dem Schornstein der Sixtinischen Kapelle hatte sich für längere Zeit eine Taube niedergelassen. Wenn das kein positives Zeichen ist. :-)


nach oben springen

#92

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 18:50
von Hans Bergman | 15.584 Beiträge | 28938 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #91
...Der "Job" ist unmöglich. Kein Mensch bei gesundem Verstand kann ihn wollen; man kann ihn höchstens als Bürde annehmen.
Ich habe auch den Eindruck, dass Schönborn vielleicht etwas zu wenig hart sein könnte. Dieses Problem hätte Scola sicher nicht. :-)

Immerhin: Auf dem Schornstein der Sixtinischen Kapelle hatte sich für längere Zeit eine Taube niedergelassen. Wenn das kein positives Zeichen ist. :-)


Positiv? Das hieße ja, der Heilige Geist in Form von Verstand würde auf die Versammlung niederkommen?
Dann würden die sofort ihr Karnevalskostüm ablegen und sich für die Welt nützlich machen.


nach oben springen

#93

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 19:12
von Maga-neu | 21.156 Beiträge | 46065 Punkte

HABEMUS PAPAM!


nach oben springen

#94

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 19:21
von ente (gelöscht)
avatar

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #93
HABEMUS PAPAM!

Papst-Frei ist vorbei. Also an die Arbeit :-)


nach oben springen

#95

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 19:52
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #93
HABEMUS PAPAM!


Das Gebimmel hab ich glatt verpasst, gute Fenster.


nach oben springen

#96

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 19:55
von Maga-neu | 21.156 Beiträge | 46065 Punkte

Ich vermute, es ist Scola.


nach oben springen

#97

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 20:04
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #96
Ich vermute, es ist Scola.


Fein!:
"Kardinal Scola gehört zu den Geistlichen, die sich vor allem um ein angebliches Opfer des Missbrauchsskandals sorgen: die Kirche selbst. Scola sprach von "lügnerischen Anschuldigungen" und fürchtete, die Kirche könne als solche diskreditiert werden. Die Kirche sah er einer "inquisitorischen Erniedrigung" ausgesetzt."

Einer meiner Freunde aus dem Gruselkabinett.


nach oben springen

#98

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 20:23
von Leto_II. | 20.630 Beiträge | 29433 Punkte

Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #96
Ich vermute, es ist Scola.


Daneben, jetzt muss ich mich einlesen.:)


nach oben springen

#99

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 20:24
von Landegaard | 16.204 Beiträge | 23896 Punkte

Zitat von Leto_II. im Beitrag #97
Zitat von Maga-neu im Beitrag #96
Ich vermute, es ist Scola.


Fein!:
"Kardinal Scola gehört zu den Geistlichen, die sich vor allem um ein angebliches Opfer des Missbrauchsskandals sorgen: die Kirche selbst. Scola sprach von "lügnerischen Anschuldigungen" und fürchtete, die Kirche könne als solche diskreditiert werden. Die Kirche sah er einer "inquisitorischen Erniedrigung" ausgesetzt."

Einer meiner Freunde aus dem Gruselkabinett.


Nix Scola



nach oben springen

#100

RE: Der nächste Papst

in Allgemeines 13.03.2013 20:42
von Lea S. | 14.199 Beiträge | 13418 Punkte

Argentinien bekam den Zuschlag!


nach oben springen

Arbeitgeberbewertung
Besucher
2 Mitglieder und 3 Gäste sind Online:
Leto_II., Landegaard

Wir begrüßen unser neuestes Mitglied: utzpolitz
Besucherzähler
Heute waren 41 Gäste und 8 Mitglieder online.

Forum Statistiken
Das Forum hat 1365 Themen und 253106 Beiträge.

Heute waren 8 Mitglieder Online:
Corto, ghassan, Hans Bergman, Landegaard, Leto_II., Nadine, nahal, Willie

Xobor Einfach ein eigenes Forum erstellen